Journal article

Does the presence of an intact primary increase the risk of nonelective colorectal surgery in patients treated with bevacizumab?

NN Baxter, R Sutradhar, F Dossa, L Fu, P Rochon, AC Wei, ED Kennedy, CC Earle

Colorectal Disease | WILEY | Published : 2020

Abstract

AIM: In patients with incurable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), resection of the primary tumour is debated; however, patients with intact primaries may be at a higher risk of complications requiring surgery when receiving treatment with bevacizumab. Our aim was to estimate the risk of nonelective colorectal surgery in patients undergoing bevacizumab therapy for mCRC and evaluate the association between intact primary tumours and risk of nonelective surgery. METHOD: We designed a population-based, retrospective cohort study using administrative and cancer registry data in Ontario, Canada. We included patients with mCRC who received bevacizumab from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2014. The..

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Grants

Awarded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Foundation


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was conducted with the support of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and Cancer Care Ontario through funding provided by the Government of Ontario and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Foundation grant (148470) granted to Dr Nancy Baxter. This study was supported by ICES, which is funded by an annual grant from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC). The opinions, results and conclusions reported in this paper are those of the authors and are independent from the funding sources. No endorsement by ICES or the Ontario MOHLTC is intended or should be inferred. Parts of this material are based on data and information compiled and provided by Canadian Institutes of Health Information (CIHI). However, the analyses, conclusions, opinions and statements expressed herein are those of the authors, and not necessarily those of CIHI. Parts of this material are based on data and information provided by Cancer Care Ontario (CCO). The opinions, results, view, and conclusions reported in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of CCO. No endorsement by CCO is intended or should be inferred. The authors thank Corinne Daly from Canadian Partnership Against Cancer for her assistance with this manuscript and Hadas Fischer from ICES for help with study design.