Journal article

Protein Component of Oyster Glycogen Nanoparticles: An Anchor Point for Functionalization

Quinn A Besford, Alessia CG Weiss, Jonas Schubert, Timothy M Ryan, Manfred F Maitz, Pietro Pacchin Tomanin, Marco Savioli, Carsten Werner, Andreas Fery, Frank Caruso, Francesca Cavalieri

ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces | American Chemical Society | Published : 2020

Abstract

Biosourced nanoparticles have a range of desirable properties for therapeutic applications, including biodegradability and low immunogenicity. Glycogen, a natural polysaccharide nanoparticle, has garnered much interest as a component of advanced therapeutic materials. However, functionalizing glycogen for use as a therapeutic material typically involves synthetic approaches that can negatively affect the intrinsic physiological properties of glycogen. Herein, the protein component of glycogen is examined as an anchor point for the photopolymerization of functional poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) polymers. Oyster glycogen (OG) nanoparticles partially degrade to smaller spherical particle..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

Part of this work was performed at the Australian Synchrotron (Q.A.B., AS173/SAXS/12732). This research was conducted and funded in part by the Alexander von Humboldt foundation (Q.A.B.) and the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology (project number CE140100036). F.C. acknowledges the award of a National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Principal Research Fellowship (GNT1135806). We gratefully acknowledge Dr. Nigel Kirby and Dr. Andrew Christofferson for support with the synchrotron experiments, Christina Harnisch for assistance with the GPC experiments, and Dr. Tian Zheng and Dr. Matthew Biviano for assistance with the AFM measurements. This work was performed in part at the Materials Characterization and Fabrication Platform (MCFP) of The University of Melbourne.