Journal article

IFN-I and IL-22 mediate protective effects of intestinal viral infection

Jessica A Neil, Yu Matsuzawa-Ishimoto, Elisabeth Kernbauer-Holzl, Samantha L Schuster, Stela Sota, Mericien Venzon, Simone Dallari, Antonio Galvao Neto, Ashley Hine, David Hudesmans, P'ng Loke, Timothy J Nice, Ken Cadwell

Nature Microbiology | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

Products derived from bacterial members of the gut microbiota evoke immune signalling pathways of the host that promote immunity and barrier function in the intestine. How immune reactions to enteric viruses support intestinal homeostasis is unknown. We recently demonstrated that infection by murine norovirus (MNV) reverses intestinal abnormalities following depletion of bacteria, indicating that an intestinal animal virus can provide cues to the host that are typically attributed to the microbiota. Here, we elucidate mechanisms by which MNV evokes protective responses from the host. We identify an important role for the viral protein NS1/2 in establishing local replication and a type I inte..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Microcopy Core


Awarded by Histopathology and Immunohistochemistry Core


Awarded by Cytometry and Cell Sorting Laboratory


Awarded by Genome Technology Center


Awarded by US National Institute of Health (NIH)


Awarded by NYU CTSI


Awarded by NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

We wish to thank the following NYU facilities for the use of their instruments and technical assistance: Microcopy Core (grant no. RR023704), Histopathology and Immunohistochemistry Core (grant nos P30CA016087, NIH S10 OD010584-01A1 and S10 OD018338-01), the Cytometry and Cell Sorting Laboratory (grant no. P30CA016087), the Genome Technology Center (grant no. P30CA016087) and the Gnotobitoic Facility (Colton Center for Autoimmunity). We also wish to thank S. Fujii (Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis) for his technical support in human organoid culture. This research was supported by US National Institute of Health (NIH) grant nos R01 HL123340 (K.C.), R01 DK093668 (K.C.), R01 DK103788 (K.C. and P.L.), R01 AI121244 (K.C.) and R01 AI130945 (P.L.). This work was also supported by a Vilcek Fellowship (J.A.N.), Sir Keith Murdoch Fellowship (J.A.N.), Crohn's & Colitis Foundation Research Fellowship Award (Y.M.-I.), Faculty Scholar grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (K.C.), Advanced Research Grant from the Merieux Institute (K.C.), Rainin Foundation Innovator Award (K.C.), Stony Wold-Herbert Fund (K.C.), PureTech Health (K.C.), Pfizer (K.C. and P.L.), NYU CTSI (grant no. NIH/NCATS 1UL TR001445; K.C. and P.L.) and philanthropy from Bernard Levine (K.C. and P.L.). K.C. is a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigator in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Diseases.