Journal article

Surface ozone exceedances in Melbourne, Australia are shown to be under NOx control, as demonstrated using formaldehyde:NO2 and glyoxal:formaldehyde ratios

Robert G Ryan, Steve Rhodes, Matt Tully, Robyn Schofield

The Science of The Total Environment | ELSEVIER | Published : 2020

Abstract

Two and a half years of multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal (CHOCHO) are presented alongside in-situ ozone (O3) measurements in Melbourne, Australia. Seasonal and diurnal cycles, vertical profiles and relationships with key meteorological variables are provided. NO2 and CHOCHO were found at highest concentration for low wind speeds implying that their sources were predominantly localised and anthropogenic. HCHO showed an exponential relationship with temperature and a strong wind direction dependence from the northern and eastern sectors, and therefore most likely originated from oxidation ..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science


Awarded by Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes


Awarded by Australian Research Council's Discovery project: Tackling Atmospheric Chemistry Grand Challenges in the Southern Hemisphere


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by funding from the Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science (CE110001028), the Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CE170100023), the Australian Research Council's Discovery project: Tackling Atmospheric Chemistry Grand Challenges in the Southern Hemisphere (DP160101598) and the Dr. Albert Shimmins Memorial Fund (through the University of Melbourne). RR gratefully acknowledges helpful discussionswith Prof. Peter Rayner and Dr. Nicholas Jones and thanks Dr. Udo Friess for access to and assistance with the HEIPRO algorithm. The authors acknowledge the authors of the QDOAS software: Thomas Danckeart, Caroline Fayt and Michel van Roozendael. We are also grateful to Dr. Blair Trewin at the Bureau of Meteorology for assistance with access to meteorological data.