Journal article

Observation of on-ice wind waves under grease ice in the western Arctic Ocean

Tsubasa Kodaira, Takuji Waseda, Takehiko Nose, Kazutoshi Sato, Jun Inoue, Joey Voermans, Alexander Babanin

Polar Science | Elsevier BV | Published : 2020

Abstract

The significant reduction of the sea-ice extent in the western Arctic has been observed by the sustained satellite observations since 1979. The opening ocean is now allowing waves to evolve and propagate under the presence of the Arctic sea-ice. A better understanding of the wave-ice interaction is necessary for the safe shipping over the sea-ice covered Arctic Ocean and for the better future Arctic climate projection. During R/V Mirai Arctic Expedition in October 2019, two drifting wave-buoys are consecutively deployed in the open ocean and the Arctic marginal ice zone (MIZ) with grease ice and pancake ice. The waves and sea-ice conditions at the time of the deployments were documented in d..

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Grants

Awarded by Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology through the ArCS project (Arctic Challenge for Sustainability Project)


Awarded by Arctic Challenge for Sustainability II (ArCS II) Project


Awarded by JSPS KAKENHI


Awarded by KAKENHI


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was sponsored by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology through the ArCS project (Arctic Challenge for Sustainability Project, grant number JPMXD1300000000) and was partially carried out in the Arctic Challenge for Sustainability II (ArCS II) Project (Program Grant Number JPMXD1420318865) . A part of this study was also conducted under JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP 16H02429 and 19H05512. JI acknowledges support from the KAKENHI grant numbers 18H03745 and 18KK0292. Daily SST and SIC data were downloaded from the Arctic Data archive System (ADS) at https://ads.nipr.ac.jp/. The SAR image from Sentinel1B satellite was created by NOAA and obtained from NOAA CoastWatch (https://coastwatch.noaa.gov) . The original data ofthe Sentinel1B are provided to NOAA by the Copernicus Program. The authors wish to thank Dr. Yasushi Fujiwara for useful discussions and suggestions. The authors also wish to thank Dr. Pieter Smit for the detailed information on the spectral estimates of Spotter wave buoys. The authors are grateful to the R/V Mirai crew on board MR19-03C who made the Arctic expedition possible.