Journal article

Association of deficits in short-term learning and A beta and hippocampal volume in cognitively normal adults

Yen Ying Lim, Jenalle E Baker, Loren Bruns, Andrea Mills, Christopher Fowler, Jurgen Fripp, Stephanie R Rainey-Smith, David Ames, Colin L Masters, Paul Maruff

NEUROLOGY | LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS | Published : 2020

Abstract

Objective To determine the extent to which deficits in learning over 6 days are associated with β-amyloid–positive (Aβ+) and hippocampal volume in cognitively normal (CN) adults. Methods Eighty CN older adults who had undergone PET neuroimaging to determine Aβ status (n = 42 Aβ− and 38 Aβ+), MRI to determine hippocampal and ventricular volume, and repeated assessment of memory were recruited from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study. Participants completed the Online Repeatable Cognitive Assessment–Language Learning Test (ORCA-LLT), which required they learn associations between 50 Chinese characters and their English language equivalents over 6 days. ORCA-LLT asses..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

Supported by the Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) for Mental Health. The CRC program is an Australian Government Initiative. Funding for the Online Repeatable Cognitive Assessment study was provided by the Dementia Australia Research Foundation and the Victorian Medical Research Acceleration Fund. Funding for the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle study was provided in part by the study partners (Australian Commonwealth Scientific Industrial and Research Organization, Edith Cowan University, Mental Health Research Institute, Alzheimer's Australia, National Ageing Research Institute, Austin Health, CogState Ltd., Hollywood Private Hospital, Sir Charles Gardner Hospital). The study also received support from the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Dementia Collaborative Research Centres program, as well as ongoing funding from the Science and Industry Endowment Fund. Y.Y.L. reports grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council (GNT1111603, GNT1147465).