Journal article

A Randomized Trial on the Effect of Phosphate Reduction on Vascular End Points in CKD (IMPROVE-CKD)

Nigel D Toussaint, Eugenia Pedagogos, Nicole M Lioufas, Grahame J Elder, Elaine M Pascoe, Sunil V Badve, Andrea Valks, Geoffrey A Block, Neil Boudville, James D Cameron, Katrina L Campbell, Sylvia SM Chen, Randall J Faull, Stephen G Holt, Dana Jackson, Meg J Jardine, David W Johnson, Peter G Kerr, Kenneth K Lau, Lai-Seong Hooi Show all

Journal of the American Society of Nephrology | AMER SOC NEPHROLOGY | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hyperphosphatemia is associated with increased fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), arterial calcification, and cardiovascular mortality. Effects of phosphate-lowering medication on vascular calcification and arterial stiffness in CKD remain uncertain. METHODS: To assess the effects of non-calcium-based phosphate binders on intermediate cardiovascular markers, we conducted a multicenter, double-blind trial, randomizing 278 participants with stage 3b or 4 CKD and serum phosphate >1.00 mmol/L (3.10 mg/dl) to 500 mg lanthanum carbonate or matched placebo thrice daily for 96 weeks. We analyzed the primary outcome, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, using a linear mixed effects mode..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Shire (a member of the Takeda group of companies)


Awarded by National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences


Funding Acknowledgements

This investigator-initiated research work was supported by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia research grants APP1044302, APP1092957, and ID 631731, and by Shire (a member of the Takeda group of companies) grant IST-AUS-000108. National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and Shire International did not have any role in study design, collection, analysis and interpretation of data, writing the report, and the decision to submit the report for publication. The Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research received support from National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences grant UL1 TR000445.