Journal article

Controlling the Biological Fate of Micellar Nanoparticles: Balancing Stealth and Targeting

Amal J Sivaram, Andri Wardiana, Sheilajen Alcantara, Stefan E Sonderegger, Nicholas L Fletcher, Zachary H Houston, Christopher B Howard, Stephen M Mahler, Cameron Alexander, Stephen J Kent, Craig A Bell, Kristofer J Thurecht

ACS Nano | AMER CHEMICAL SOC | Published : 2020

Abstract

Integrating nanomaterials with biological entities has led to the development of diagnostic tools and biotechnology-derived therapeutic products. However, to optimize the design of these hybrid bionanomaterials, it is essential to understand how controlling the biological interactions will influence desired outcomes. Ultimately, this knowledge will allow more rapid translation from the bench to the clinic. In this paper, we developed a micellar system that was assembled using modular antibody-polymer amphiphilic materials. The amphiphilic nature was established using either poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) or a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) from an antibody as the hydrophile and a thermor..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology


Awarded by ARC Training Centre for Innovation in Biomedical Imaging Technologies


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge the facilities and the scientific and technical assistance of the National Imaging Facility at the Centre for Advanced Imaging, University of Queensland. Funding for this research is acknowledged from the National Health and Medical Research Council (APP1099321 and APP1148582 (KJ.T.); APP1054569 (C.A.B.)) and the Australian Research Council (LP150100703 (KJ.T.)). This work was performed in part at the Queensland node of the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF), a company established under the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy to provide nano-and microfabrication facilities for Australia's researchers. This research was conducted and funded by the ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology (CE140100036) and in part by the ARC Training Centre for Innovation in Biomedical Imaging Technologies (IC170100035).