Journal article

The cross-sectional relationship between pain and awareness of age-related changes

Serena Sabatini, Obioha C Ukoumunne, Clive Ballard, Rachel Collins, Anne Corbett, Helen Brooker, Linda Clare

BRITISH JOURNAL OF PAIN | SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD | Published : 2020

Abstract

Background: Awareness of positive and negative age-related changes (AARC gains and losses) captures the perceived changes that older individuals experience in several domains of their lives including physical, cognitive and social functioning; interpersonal relationships; and lifestyle. Exploring antecedents of AARC is important to identify those individuals that could benefit the most from interventions promoting positive experiences of ageing and/or adaptation to age-related changes. This study investigates the experience of pain as a predictor of lower AARC gains and higher AARC losses. Methods: Analyses are based on cross-sectional data from the PROTECT cohort (2019); 1013 UK residents (..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in Cognitive Health


Funding Acknowledgements

The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship and/or publication of this article: This work was supported by the University of Exeter College of Life and Environmental Sciences (School of Psychology); University of Exeter College of Medicine and Health; and the National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in Cognitive Health (#1100579 to Kaarin Anstey). This paper represents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. O.C.U. was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration (ARC) South West Peninsula. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care. We are grateful to Adam Hampshire and Dag Aarsland as they contributed to data collection and design of the PROTECT study.