Journal article

Does cortical brain morphology act as a mediator between childhood trauma and transition to psychosis in young individuals at ultra-high risk?

Marta Rapado-Castro, Sarah Whittle, Christos Pantelis, Andrew Thompson, Barnaby Nelson, Eleni P Ganella, Ashleigh Lin, Renate LEP Reniers, Patrick D McGorry, Alison R Yung, Stephen J Wood, Cali F Bartholomeusz

SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH | ELSEVIER | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Childhood trauma, particularly sexual abuse, has been associated with transition to psychosis in individuals at "ultra-high risk" (UHR). This study investigated whether the effects of various forms of childhood trauma on transition to psychosis are mediated by cortical thickness and surface area abnormalities. METHODS: This prospective study used data from 62 UHR individuals from a previous (PACE 400) cohort study. At follow-up, 24 individuals had transitioned to psychosis (UHR-T) and 38 individuals had not transitioned (UHR-NT). Student-t/Mann-Whitney-U tests were performed to assess morphological differences in childhood trauma (low/high) and transition. Mediation analyses were..

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Grants

Awarded by Ramon y Cajal Research Fellowship


Awarded by Institute of Health Carlos III


Awarded by Brain & Behavior Research Foundation


Awarded by Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, Instituto de Salud Carlos III


Awarded by CIBERSAM, Madrid Regional Government


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by NHMRC Australian-based Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

MR-C was supported by a Ramon y Cajal Research Fellowship (RYC-2017-23144), Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities, a Sara Borrell Health Research Fellowship (CD10/00158) from the Institute of Health Carlos III, Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, an Alicia Koplowitz Research Grant and Short-Term Visiting Fellowship from the Alicia Koplowitz Foundation, a Fellowship Award from the Health Research Institute, Hospital Gregorio Maranon (Madrid, Spain), and a NARSAD independent investigator grant (24628) from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation. MR-C was partially supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (PI15/00723, PI18/00753), co-financed by ERDF Funds from the European Commission, "A way of making Europe", CIBERSAM, Madrid Regional Government (B2017/BMD-3740 AGES-CM-2), European Union Structural Funds and European Union Seventh Framework Program, European Union H2020 Program under the Innovative Medicines Initiative 2 Joint; Fundacion Familia Alonso, Fundacion Alicia Koplowitz and Fundacion Mutua Madrilena. BN was supported by an NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship (1137687). AL is supported by a NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (1148793). SW was supported by a NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (1125504). CP has received a NHMRC Australian-based Senior Principal Research Fellowship (628386), NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Award, and NHMRC Program Grant (566529); he has received grant support from Janssen-Cilag, Eli Lilly, Hospira (Mayne), Astra Zeneca and has provided consultancy to Janssen-Cilag, Eli Lilly, Hospira (Mayne), Astra Zeneca, Pfizer, Schering Plough, Lundbeck. He has undertaken investigator initiated studies supported by Eli Lilly, Hospira, Janssen Cilag and Astra Zeneca.