Journal article

Developing Expert Consensus on How to Address Weight Stigma in Public Health Research and Practice: A Delphi Study

Laura M Hart, Katelyn B Ferreira, Suman Ambwani, Erin B Gibson, S Bryn Austin

STIGMA AND HEALTH | EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING FOUNDATION-AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC | Published : 2021

Abstract

Some public health practices, especially those focused on weight loss, have been found to increase weight stigma, which is harmful to physical and mental health. We used the Delphi method to establish expert consensus on how to address weight stigma in public health. Our participants were recruited from a convenience sample of individuals attending a single-day symposium on public health prevention of eating disorders, though they reported having high levels of formal (education, employment) and informal (advocacy, lived experience in eating disorders) expertise, all of which was relevant to weight stigma. Three online surveys were completed by 88 experts. Of the 177 ideas presented, 68 were..

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Grants

Awarded by Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, US Department of Health and Human Services


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank STRIPED/Catalyst Eating Disorder Prevention Symposium Weight Stigma Panelists (Lisa Du Breuil, LICSW; Kendrin Sonneville, ScD, RD; Josiemer Mattei, PhD, MPH; and Iyiola Solanke, PhD) and Moderator (Kirsten Davison, PhD), as well as the weight stigma breakout session Facilitator (Allegra Gordon, ScD, MPH) and symposium participants. Support for this work has been provided by the Ellen Feldberg Gordon Fund for Eating Disorders Prevention Research and the Strategic Training Initiative for the Prevention of Eating Disorders. S.B. Austin is supported by training Grants T71-MC-00009 and T76-MC00001 from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, US Department of Health and Human Services. Suman Ambwani was supported by a Faculty Sabbatical Grant from the Research and Development Committee, Dickinson College. Laura M. Hart was supported by an Australia Awards Endeavour Fellowship and Australian Rotary Health Colin Dodds Postdoctoral Fellowship in Mental Health Research.