Journal article

Person-Specific Biomolecular Coronas Modulate Nanoparticle Interactions with Immune Cells in Human Blood

Yi Ju, Hannah G Kelly, Laura F Dagley, Arnold Reynaldi, Timothy E Schlub, Sukhdeep K Spall, Craig A Bell, Jiwei Cui, Andrew J Mitchell, Zhixing Lin, Adam K Wheatley, Kristofer J Thurecht, Miles P Davenport, Andrew Webb, Frank Caruso, Stephen J Kent

ACS Nano | AMER CHEMICAL SOC | Published : 2020

Abstract

When nanoparticles interact with human blood, a multitude of plasma components adsorb onto the surface of the nanoparticles, forming a biomolecular corona. Corona composition is known to be influenced by the chemical composition of nanoparticles. In contrast, the possible effects of variations in the human blood proteome between healthy individuals on the formation of the corona and its subsequent interactions with immune cells in blood are unknown. Herein, we prepared and examined a matrix of 11 particles (including organic and inorganic particles of three sizes and five surface chemistries) and plasma samples from 23 healthy donors to form donor-specific biomolecular coronas (personalized ..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Awarded by University of Melbourne


Awarded by National Natural Science Foundation of China


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was conducted and funded by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology (project number CE140100036). F.C. acknowledges the award of an NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship (GNT1135806), Y.J. acknowledges the award of an Early Career Researcher Grant from The University of Melbourne (ECR1032020), and J.C. acknowledges the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 21603120 and 21872085). This work was performed in part at the Materials Characterisation and Fabrication Platform (MCFP) at The University of Melbourne and the Victorian Node of the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF). Transmission electron microscopy analyses were conducted using the facilities at the Biosciences Microscopy Unit, School of Bioscience, The University of Melbourne. The authors acknowledge M. McLean, S. Alcantara, T. Amarasena, P. Brannon, J. Glass, and M. Faria for helpful discussions. All experiments were performed in accordance with the guidelines of the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research and the experiments were approved by the Human Ethics Committee at The University of Melbourne (#1443420). Informed consents were obtained from human participants of this study.