Journal article

Can counter-advertising protect spectators of elite sport against the influence of unhealthy food and beverage sponsorship? A naturalistic trial

Helen Dixon, Maree Scully, Melanie Wakefield, Bridget Kelly, Simone Pettigrew, Kathy Chapman, Jeff Niederdeppe

Social Science & Medicine | PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2020

Abstract

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVE: Unhealthy, energy-dense nutrient-poor foods and beverages are heavily promoted through sport sponsorship. This naturalistic trial assessed whether exposing young adult spectators to various types of counter-advertising (CA) before watching an unhealthy food sponsored elite sporting event could diminish sponsorship effects and increase support for restrictions on sponsorship. METHOD: Young adults (ages 18-29 years) who planned to watch the Australian Football League (AFL) Grand Final were recruited through an online panel and randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (A) control (neutral advertisement); (B) anti-industry CA (critiquing unhealthy food industry spons..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Government's National Health & Medical Research Council's 'Targeted Call for Research into Preventing Obesity in 18-24 year olds'


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the Australian Government's National Health & Medical Research Council's 'Targeted Call for Research into Preventing Obesity in 18-24 year olds' (GNT1114923). We thank the creative agencies Three Wise Men and Catch the Bird for designing and producing the anti-industry and anti-product counter-advertisements that were used as experimental stimuli in this research, Amy Collie for her work liaising with the creative agencies on behalf of the project team, and Michael Murphy Research for conducting focus group pretesting of the anti-industry and anti-product counter-advertising concepts.