Journal article

Motor neuroprosthesis implanted with neurointerventional surgery improves capacity for activities of daily living tasks in severe paralysis: first in-human experience

Thomas J Oxley, Peter E Yoo, Gil S Rind, Stephen M Ronayne, CM Sarah Lee, Christin Bird, Victoria Hampshire, Rahul P Sharma, Andrew Morokoff, Daryl L Williams, Christopher MacIsaac, Mark E Howard, Lou Irving, Ivan Vrljic, Cameron Williams, Sam E John, Frank Weissenborn, Madeleine Dazenko, Anna H Balabanski, David Friedenberg Show all

JOURNAL OF NEUROINTERVENTIONAL SURGERY | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2021

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Implantable brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), functioning as motor neuroprostheses, have the potential to restore voluntary motor impulses to control digital devices and improve functional independence in patients with severe paralysis due to brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle dysfunction. However, reports to date have had limited clinical translation. METHODS: Two participants with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) underwent implant in a single-arm, open-label, prospective, early feasibility study. Using a minimally invasive neurointervention procedure, a novel endovascular Stentrode BCI was implanted in the superior sagittal sinus adjacent to primary motor cortex...

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Grants

Awarded by US Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Microsystems Technology Office


Awarded by Office of Naval Research


Awarded by USA Department of Defense Office of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP)


Awarded by Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, Spinal Cord Injury Award Program


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)


Awarded by Australia Research Council (ARC)


Awarded by Australian Federal Government, Department of Industry, Innovation and Science


Awarded by Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by research grants from US Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Microsystems Technology Office contract N6601-12-14045; Office of Naval Research (ONR) Global N26909-14-1--N020; USA Department of Defense Office of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP), SC160158; Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, Spinal Cord Injury Award Program W81XWH-17-1-0210; National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Grants GNT1161108, GNT1062532, GNT1138110; Australia Research Council (ARC) Linkage Grant LP150100038; Australian Federal Government, Department of Industry, Innovation and Science, GIL73654; Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia, GIA1844, Global Innovation Linkage Program, Australian Federal Government; and Synchron Inc. contributed to device fabrication.