Journal article

Mental health services for infectious disease outbreaks including COVID-19: a rapid systematic review

Jing-Li Yue, Wei Yan, Yan-Kun Sun, Kai Yuan, Si-Zhen Su, Ying Han, Arun V Ravindran, Thomas Kosten, Ian Everall, Christopher G Davey, Edward Bullmore, Norito Kawakami, Corrado Barbui, Graham Thornicroft, Crick Lund, Xiao Lin, Lin Liu, Le Shi, Jie Shi, Mao-Sheng Ran Show all

Psychological Medicine | CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS | Published : 2020

Abstract

The upsurge in the number of people affected by the COVID-19 is likely to lead to increased rates of emotional trauma and mental illnesses. This article systematically reviewed the available data on the benefits of interventions to reduce adverse mental health sequelae of infectious disease outbreaks, and to offer guidance for mental health service responses to infectious disease pandemic. PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, PsycINFO, WHO Global Research Database on infectious disease, and the preprint server medRxiv were searched. Of 4278 reports identified, 32 were included in this review. Most articles of psychological interventions were implemented to address the impact of COVID-19 pandemic,..

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Grants

Awarded by National Natural Science Foundation of China


Awarded by Special Research Fund of PKUHSC for Prevention and Control of COVID-19


Awarded by National Key Research and Development Program of China


Awarded by National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health


Awarded by UK Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was partially supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (no. 81761128036, 81821092 and 31900805), the Special Research Fund of PKUHSC for Prevention and Control of COVID-19 (no. BMU2020HKYZX008) and the National Key Research and Development Program of China (no. 2019YFA0706200). GT is supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration South London at King's College London NHS Foundation Trust, and by the NIHR Asset Global Health Unit award. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care. GT also receives support from the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health under award number R01MH100470 (Cobalt study). GT is supported by the UK Medical Research Council in relation the Emilia (MR/S001255/1) and Indigo Partnership (MR/R023697/1) awards.