Journal article

Formator: Predicting Lysine Formylation Sites Based on the Most Distant Undersampling and Safe-Level Synthetic Minority Oversampling

Cangzhi Jia, Meng Zhang, Cunshuo Fan, Fuyi Li, Jiangning Song

IEEE-ACM TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY AND BIOINFORMATICS | IEEE COMPUTER SOC | Published : 2021

Abstract

Lysine formylation is a reversible type of protein post-translational modification and has been found to be involved in a myriad of biological processes, including modulation of chromatin conformation and gene expression in histones and other nuclear proteins. Accurate identification of lysine formylation sites is essential for elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms of formylation. Traditional experimental methods are time-consuming and expensive. As such, it is desirable and necessary to develop computational methods for accurate prediction of formylation sites. In this study, we propose a novel predictor, termed Formator, for identifying lysine formylation sites from sequences inf..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities


Awarded by National Natural Science Foundation of Liaoning Province


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC)


Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health



Funding Acknowledgements

C.J. was supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (3132019175, 3132019323 and 3132018230), the National Natural Science Foundation of Liaoning Province (20180550307), double first-class construction special items ("innovative project"), (CXXM2019SS022) and the National Scholarship Fund of China for Studying Abroad. J.S. was supported by Grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) (APP490989, APP1127948 and APP1144652), the Australian Research Council (ARC) (LP110200333 and DP120104460), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (R01 AI111965), and a Major Inter-Disciplinary Research (IDR) project awarded by Monash University. J.S. and F.L. are the corresponding authors.