Journal article

Antibacterial Action of Nanoparticles by Lethal Stretching of Bacterial Cell Membranes

Denver P Linklater, Vladimir A Baulin, Xavier Le Guevel, Jean-Baptiste Fleury, Eric Hanssen, The Hong Phong Nguyen, Saulius Juodkazis, Gary Bryant, Russell J Crawford, Paul Stoodley, Elena P Ivanova

Advanced Materials | WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH | Published : 2020

Abstract

It is commonly accepted that nanoparticles (NPs) can kill bacteria; however, the mechanism of antimicrobial action remains obscure for large NPs that cannot translocate the bacterial cell wall. It is demonstrated that the increase in membrane tension caused by the adsorption of NPs is responsible for mechanical deformation, leading to cell rupture and death. A biophysical model of the NP-membrane interactions is presented which suggests that adsorbed NPs cause membrane stretching and squeezing. This general phenomenon is demonstrated experimentally using both model membranes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, representing Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Hydrophil..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Canceropole Lyon Auvergne Rhone-Alpes (CLARA), Plan Cancer


Awarded by ARC


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC) Industrial Transformation Research Hubs Scheme


Awarded by ARC Industrial Transformation Training Centre (ITTC) scheme


Awarded by NIH



Funding Acknowledgements

X.L.G. would like to thank Canceropole Lyon Auvergne Rhone-Alpes (CLARA), Plan Cancer (C18038CS), and ARC (R17157CC) for their financial support. Funding from the Australian Research Council (ARC) Industrial Transformation Research Hubs Scheme (Project Number IH130100017) and ARC Industrial Transformation Training Centre (ITTC) scheme (Project number IC180100005) are gratefully acknowledged. D.P.L would like to acknowledge the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) for travel support. J.-B.F. acknowledges funding from the SFB1027 (DFG). P.S. acknowledges funding by NIH R01GM124436 National Institutes of Health. The authors acknowledge at the RMIT University Microscopy & Microanalysis Facility.