Journal article

Modelling the contribution that different sexual practices involving the oropharynx and saliva have on Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections at multiple anatomical sites in men who have sex with men

Xianglong Xu, Eric PF Chow, Jason J Ong, Christian JPA Hoebe, Deborah Williamson, Mingwang Shen, Fabian Yuh Shiong Kong, Jane S Hocking, Christopher K Fairley, Lei Zhang

SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2021

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The spectrum of sexual practices that transmit Neisseria gonorrhoeae in men who have sex with men (MSM) is controversial. No studies have modelled potential Neisseria gonorrhoeae transmission when one sexual practice follows another in the same sexual encounter ('sequential sexual practices'). Our aim was to test what sequential practices were necessary to replicate the high proportion of MSM who have more than one anatomical site infected with gonorrhoea ('multisite infection'). METHODS: To test our aim, we developed eight compartmental models. We first used a baseline model (model 1) that included no sequential sexual practices. We then added three possible sequential transmiss..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Emerging Leadership Investigator Grant


Awarded by Australian NHMRC


Awarded by National Natural Science Foundation of China


Awarded by China Postdoctoral Science Foundation


Awarded by Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities


Awarded by Natural Science Basic Research ProgramProgram of Shaanxi Province


Awarded by Outstanding Young Scholars Support Program


Awarded by Xi'an Jiaotong University Basic Research and Profession Grant


Awarded by Epidemiology modeling and risk assessment


Awarded by Xi'an Jiaotong University Young Scholar Support Grant


Funding Acknowledgements

EPFC, DW and CKF are supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Emerging Leadership Investigator Grant (GNT1172873, GNT1174555 and GNT1172900, respectively). JJO is supported by an Australian NHMRC early career fellowship (APP1104781). MS was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant number:11 801 435 (MS)), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (grant number 2018M631134M631134), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (grant number: xjh012019055, xzy032020026) and Natural Science Basic Research ProgramProgram of Shaanxi Province (Grant number: 2019JQ-187). LZ is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant number: 81950410639); Outstanding Young Scholars Support Program (Grant number: 3111500001); Xi'an Jiaotong University Basic Research and Profession Grant (Grant number: xtr022019003, xzy032020032); Epidemiology modeling and risk assessment (Grant number: 20200344) and Xi'an Jiaotong University Young Scholar Support Grant (Grant number: YX6J004).