Journal article

Cumulative impact of high job demands, low job control and high job insecurity on midlife depression and anxiety: a prospective cohort study of Australian employees.

Lay San Too, Liana Leach, Peter Butterworth

Occupational and Environmental Medicine | BMJ Publishing Group | Published : 2021

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: There is a lack of evidence concerning the prospective effect of cumulative exposure to psychosocial job stressors over time on mental ill-health. This study aimed to assess whether cumulative exposure to poor quality jobs places employees at risk of future common mental disorder. METHODS: Data were from the Personality and Total Health Through Life project (n=1279, age 40-46 at baseline). Data reported on the cumulative exposure to multiple indicators of poor psychosocial job quality over time (ie, a combination of low control, high demands and high insecurity) and future common mental disorder (ie, depressive and/or anxiety symptom scores above a validated threshold) 12 years la..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Early Career Fellowship


Awarded by ARC Future Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The PATH Through Life Study was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (973302, 179805, 418139), and the Australian Government Agency - Safe Work Australia. It is currently managed by both the ANU and the University of New South Wales. LST was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Early Career Fellowship (GNT1156849). PB was supported by ARC Future Fellowship (FT130101444) and a University of Melbourne Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences Research Fellowship.