Journal article

Association between Circulating Osteocalcin and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors following a 4-Week Leafy Green Vitamin K-Rich Diet

Alexander Tacey, Marc Sim, Cassandra Smith, Mary N Woessner, Elizabeth Byrnes, Joshua R Lewis, Tara Brennan-Speranza, Jonathan M Hodgson, Lauren C Blekkenhorst, Itamar Levinger

Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism | KARGER | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that lower serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC) may be negatively associated with cardiometabolic health. We investigated whether individuals with a suppression of ucOC following an increase in dietary vitamin K1 exhibit a relative worsening of cardiometabolic risk factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Men (n = 20) and women (n = 10) aged 62 ± 10 years participated in a randomized, controlled, crossover study. The primary analysis involved using data obtained from participants following a high vitamin K1 diet (HK; 4-week intervention of increased leafy green vegetable intake). High and low responders were defined based on the median percent reduction (30%) in uc..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC of Australia


Awarded by National Heart Foundation of Australia


Awarded by NHMRC of Australia Emerging Leadership Investigator Grant


Awarded by National Heart Foundation of Australia Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC), grant 1084922. The salary of JMH is supported by an NHMRC of Australia Senior Research Fellowship (ID: 1116973). The salary of JRL is supported by a National Heart Foundation of Australia Future Leader Fellowship (ID: 102817). The salary of LCB is supported by an NHMRC of Australia Emerging Leadership Investigator Grant (ID: 1172987) and a National Heart Foundation of Australia Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship (ID: 102498). The funders had no role in study design; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of data; writing of the manuscript; and the decision to submit the manuscript for publication.