Journal article

Baseline characteristics and age-related macular degeneration in participants of the "ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly" (ASPREE)-AMD trial

Liubov D Robman, Thi Phuong Thao Le, Robyn H Guymer, Rory Wolfe, Robyn L Woods, Lauren AB Hodgson, James Phung, Galina A Makeyeva, Le-Pham Y-Anh, Suzanne G Orchard, Jewhara Suleiman, Emily Maguire, Ruth E Trevaks, Stephanie A Ward, Moeen Riaz, Paul Lacaze, Elsdon Storey, Walter P Abhayaratna, Mark R Nelson, Michael E Ernst Show all

Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications | ELSEVIER INC | Published : 2020

Abstract

Purpose: To describe the baseline participant characteristics in the ASPREE-AMD study, investigating the effect of aspirin on AMD incidence and progression. Methods: Australian participants from the ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) trial, randomized to 100 mg aspirin daily or placebo, had non-mydriatic, digital color fundus images graded according to the Beckman AMD classification. Associations with AMD were determined for baseline characteristics and genetic risk variants. Results: ASPREE-AMD sub-study enrolled 4993 participants with gradable macular images. Median age was 73.4 years (IQR, 71.5, 76.6), 52% were female, 10% had diabetes mellitus, 73% had hypertension, and 4..

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Grants

Awarded by National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by National Eye Institute at the National Institutes of Health


Funding Acknowledgements

The principal ASPREE study was supported by the National Institute on Aging and the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health (grant #U01AG029824); the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (grants #334047 and #1127060); Monash University (Australia); and the Victorian Cancer Agency (Australia). A. G. Bayer provided aspirin and matching placebo but played no other role in the trial. Bio platform Australia funded genotyping with a SNP array on the ASPREE cohort.The ASPREE-AMD sub-study was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (research grant #APP1051625 and equipment grant) and the National Eye Institute at the National Institutes of Health (grant #R01EY026890), the Phyllis Connor Memorial Trust, Jack Brockhoff Foundation and Eric Ormond Baker Charitable Trust. CERA provided retinal cameras; Monash University funded two Bio bus clinical vehicles for photography in more remote regions. CERA receives Operational Infrastructure Support from the Victorian Government.