Journal article

EVALUATION OF MEDETOMIDINE-KETAMINE AND MEDETOMIDINE-KETAMINE-BUTORPHANOL FOR THE FIELD ANESTHESIA OF FREE-RANGING DROMEDARY CAMELS (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS) IN AUSTRALIA

Wayne SJ Boardman, Mark R Lethbridge, Jordan O Hampton, Ian Smith, Andrew P Woolnough, Margaret-Mary McEwen, Graham WJ Miller, Charles GB Caraguel

Journal of Wildlife Diseases | WILDLIFE DISEASE ASSOC, INC | Published : 2014

Abstract

Abstract We report the clinical course and physiologic and anesthetic data for a case series of 76 free-ranging dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) chemically restrained, by remote injection from a helicopter, in the rangelands of Western Australia and South Australia, 2008-11, to attach satellite-tracking collars. Fifty-five camels were successfully anesthetized using medetomidine-ketamine (MK, n=27) and medetomidine-ketamine-butorphanol (MKB, n=28); the induction of anesthesia in 21 animals was considered unsuccessful. To produce reliable anesthesia for MK, medetomidine was administered at 0.22 mg/kg (± SD=0.05) and ketamine at 2.54 mg/kg (± 0.56), and for MKB, medetomidine was administ..

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Funding Acknowledgements

We thank the following for their help during the course of this project: Cate Creighton, Stephen Bent, Ken Rose, Rob Parr, Gary Martin, Andrew Longbottom, Michael Elliot, Neville McInerney, Stephen Wait, Nikki Anderson, Neil Burrows, Megan Harper, and Lindell Andrews. Thanks go to Viktor Molnar for reviewing this manuscript. This project was funded by the Bureau of Rural Sciences of the Australian government, the Rangelands Natural Resource Management Coordinating Group, the Kimberley Zone Control Authority, the West Australia Department of Agriculture and Food (DAFWA), and Primary Industries and Regions of South Australian under its Australian Pest Animal Management Program. Ecoknowledge and the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences of the University of Adelaide also provided support. The DAFWA ethics committee and the South Australian wildlife ethics committee approved the projects.