Journal article

Multi-Omic Data Integration Allows Baseline Immune Signatures to Predict Hepatitis B Vaccine Response in a Small Cohort

Casey P Shannon, Travis M Blimkie, Rym Ben-Othman, Nicole Gladish, Nelly Amenyogbe, Sibyl Drissler, Rachel D Edgar, Queenie Chan, Mel Krajden, Leonard J Foster, Michael S Kobor, William W Mohn, Ryan R Brinkman, Kim-Anh Le Cao, Richard H Scheuermann, Scott J Tebbutt, Robert Ew Hancock, Wayne C Koff, Tobias R Kollmann, Manish Sadarangani Show all

FRONTIERS IN IMMUNOLOGY | FRONTIERS MEDIA SA | Published : 2020

Abstract

Background: Vaccination remains one of the most effective means of reducing the burden of infectious diseases globally. Improving our understanding of the molecular basis for effective vaccine response is of paramount importance if we are to ensure the success of future vaccine development efforts. Methods: We applied cutting edge multi-omics approaches to extensively characterize temporal molecular responses following vaccination with hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine. Data were integrated across cellular, epigenomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and fecal microbiome profiles, and correlated to final HBV antibody titres. Results: Using both an unsupervised molecular-interaction network integrat..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)


Awarded by Genome BC


Awarded by Canadian Institutes for Health Research


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Career Development fellowship


Awarded by National Institute of Health/National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases Human Immunology Project Consortium Grant


Funding Acknowledgements

We acknowledge funding from the Human Vaccines Project. REWH was the recipient of a UBC Killam Professorship and a Canada Research Chair in Health and Genomics. REWH acknowledges funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) [funding reference number FDN-154287]. Mass spectrometry infrastructure used here was funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the BC Knowledge Development Fund. Its operation is supported by Genome Canada and Genome BC (214PRO). NA and WWM were supported by a Project Grant (148781) from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research. MS is supported via salary awards from the BC Children's Hospital Foundation, the Canadian Child Health Clinician Scientist Program and the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research. MS has been an investigator on projects funded by GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Pfizer, Sanofi-Pasteur, Seqirus, Symvivo and VBI Vaccines. All funds have been paid to his institute, and he has not received any personal payments. KL was supported in part by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Career Development fellowship (GNT1159458). TB, CS, and ST were supported by the National Institute of Health/National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases Human Immunology Project Consortium Grant 5U19AI118608. AL is supported by Simon Fraser University New Faculty Start-up Grant.