Journal article

Temperature limits to deep subseafloor life in the Nankai Trough subduction zone

Verena B Heuer, Fumio Inagaki, Yuki Morono, Yusuke Kubo, Arthur J Spivack, Bernhard Viehweger, Tina Treude, Felix Beulig, Florence Schubotz, Satoshi Tonai, Stephen A Bowden, Margaret Cramm, Susann Henkel, Takehiro Hirose, Kira Homola, Tatsuhiko Hoshino, Akira Ijiri, Hiroyuki Imachi, Nana Kamiya, Masanori Kaneko Show all

SCIENCE | AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE | Published : 2020

Abstract

Microorganisms in marine subsurface sediments substantially contribute to global biomass. Sediments warmer than 40°C account for roughly half the marine sediment volume, but the processes mediated by microbial populations in these hard-to-access environments are poorly understood. We investigated microbial life in up to 1.2-kilometer-deep and up to 120°C hot sediments in the Nankai Trough subduction zone. Above 45°C, concentrations of vegetative cells drop two orders of magnitude and endospores become more than 6000 times more abundant than vegetative cells. Methane is biologically produced and oxidized until sediments reach 80° to 85°C. In 100° to 120°C sediments, isotopic evidence and incr..

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Grants

Awarded by JSPS Funding Program for Next Generation World-Leading Researchers


Awarded by JSPS


Awarded by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft


Awarded by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through Cluster of Excellence "The Ocean Floor -Earth's Uncharted Interface"


Awarded by ODP U.S. Science Support Program (National Science Foundation)


Awarded by Natural Environment Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Strategic Fund for Strengthening Leading-Edge Research and Development (to JAMSTEC and F.I.); the JSPS Funding Program for Next Generation World-Leading Researchers (GR102 to F.I.); JSPS Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research JP26251041, JP19H05503, and JP20K20429 (to F.I. and T.Ho.) and JP19H00730 (to Y.M., A.I., and T.Ho.); the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through projects 387745511 (to V.B.H.), 408178672 (to F.S.), 408249062 (to J.K.), 279667358, Hi 616-14-1 (to K.-U.H.), and through the Cluster of Excellence "The Ocean Floor -Earth's Uncharted Interface" (project 390741603), the IODP U.S. Science Support Program (National Science Foundation prime award OCE-1450528 to T.T.), and the Natural Environment Research Council awards NE/P015182/1 and NE/R003408/1 (to S.A.B. and H.M., respectively). Additional support enabling this project was provided by the DCO.