Journal article

Structural brain imaging studies offer clues about the effects of the shared genetic etiology among neuropsychiatric disorders

Nevena V Radonjic, Jonathan L Hess, Paula Rovira, Ole Andreassen, Jan K Buitelaar, Christopher RK Ching, Barbara Franke, Martine Hoogman, Neda Jahanshad, Carrie McDonald, Lianne Schmaal, Sanjay M Sisodiya, Dan J Stein, Odile A van den Heuvel, Theo GM van Erp, Daan van Rooij, Dick J Veltman, Paul Thompson, Stephen V Faraone

MOLECULAR PSYCHIATRY | SPRINGERNATURE | Published : 2021

Abstract

Genomewide association studies have found significant genetic correlations among many neuropsychiatric disorders. In contrast, we know much less about the degree to which structural brain alterations are similar among disorders and, if so, the degree to which such similarities have a genetic etiology. From the Enhancing Neuroimaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) consortium, we acquired standardized mean differences (SMDs) in regional brain volume and cortical thickness between cases and controls. We had data on 41 brain regions for: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), bipolar disorder (BD), epilepsy, major depressive disorder (MDD), obse..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by European Union's Seventh Framework Program for research, technological development and demonstration


Awarded by European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program


Awarded by NIMH


Awarded by Research Council of Norway


Awarded by personal Vici grant from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)


Awarded by European Union's Horizon 2020 program


Awarded by NIH


Awarded by personal Veni grant from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)


Awarded by Agencia de Gestio d'Ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca (AGAUR), Generalitat de Catalunya, Spain


Awarded by NHMRC Career Development Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

SVF is supported by the European Union's Seventh Framework Program for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no. 602805, the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreements nos. 667302 and 728018 and NIMH grants 5R01MH101519 and U01 MH109536-01. Research Council of Norway (#223273). BF is supported by a personal Vici grant from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO, grant number 91813669) and by a grant from the European Union's Horizon 2020 program for the CoCa project (grant agreement no 667302). ENIGMA work is supported by NIH grants U54 EB020403 (PI: PT), R01 MH116147 (PI: PT) and R01MH117601 (MPIs: NJ and LS). MH is supported by a personal Veni grant from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO, grant number 91619115). CMD is supported by NIH grants R01 NS065838 and R21 NS107739. PR is a recipient of a pre-doctoral fellowship from the Agencia de Gestio d'Ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca (AGAUR), Generalitat de Catalunya, Spain (2016FI_B 00899). LS is supported by a NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (1140764). SMS is supported by Epilepsy Society, UK, and the work was partly undertaken at UCLH/UCL, which received a proportion of funding from the UK Department of Health's NIHR Biomedical Research Centers funding scheme.). TGMVE is supported by NIH grants U54 EB020403 (PI: PT), R01 MH116147 (PI: PT), R01MH117601 (MPIs: NJ and LS), and R01MH121246 (MPIs: Turner, TGMVE, and Calhoun).