Journal article

Time from presentation to pre-diagnostic chest X-ray in patients with symptomatic lung cancer: a cohort study using electronic patient records from English primary care

Kirsten D Arendse, Fiona M Walter, Mark Pilling, Yin Zhou, Willie Hamilton, Garth Funston

BRITISH JOURNAL OF GENERAL PRACTICE | ROYAL COLL GENERAL PRACTITIONERS | Published : 2021

Abstract

BACKGROUND: National guidelines in England recommend prompt chest X-ray (within 14 days) in patients presenting in general practice with unexplained symptoms of possible lung cancer, including persistent cough, shortness of breath, or weight loss. AIM: To examine time to chest X-ray in symptomatic patients in English general practice before lung cancer diagnosis, and explore demographical variation. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective cohort study using routinely collected general practice, cancer registry, and imaging data from England. METHOD: Patients with lung cancer who presented symptomatically in general practice in the year pre-diagnosis and who had a pre-diagnostic chest X-ray were in..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) School for Primary Care Research grant


Awarded by Cancer Research UK


Awarded by Wellcome Trust Primary Care Clinician PhD fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

Data acquisition was funded as part of an National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) School for Primary Care Research grant (reference: FR13/346). This work arises from the CanTest Collaborative, which is funded by Cancer Research UK (reference: C8640/A23385), of which Garth Funston is Clinical Research Fellow and Willie Hamilton and Fiona M Walter are Directors. Yin Zhou is funded by a Wellcome Trust Primary Care Clinician PhD fellowship (reference: 203921/Z/16/Z). The funders of this study had no role in the study design, data collection, data analysis, data interpretation, or writing of the report. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR, the Department of Health and Social Care, or Cancer Research UK.