Journal article

Visual Memory Deficits in Middle-Aged APOE epsilon 4 Homozygotes Detected Using Unsupervised Cognitive Assessments

Yen Ying Lim, Matthew P Pase, Rachel F Buckley, Nawaf Yassi, Lisa Bransby, Christopher Fowler, Simon M Laws, Colin L Masters, Paul Maruff

JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMERS DISEASE | IOS PRESS | Published : 2021

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4 allele is associated with dose-response effects on cognitive dysfunction and dementia risk in older adults. However, its effects on cognition in middle-aged adults remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We examined effects of ɛ4 heterozygosity and homozygosity on objective and subjective cognition in middle-aged adults enrolled in the Healthy Brain Project (HBP) and in older adults from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study. METHODS: HBP participants (1,000 non-carriers; 450 ɛ4 heterozygotes; 50 ɛ4 homozygotes) completed unsupervised assessments of the Cogstate Brief Battery (CBB), ratings of subjective cognitive function and provided a..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Alzheimer's Association


Awarded by National Heart Foundation of Australia


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship


Awarded by National Institutes of Health K99-R00 award


Funding Acknowledgements

The Healthy Brain Project (healthybrainproject. org.au) is funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (GNT1158384, GNT1147465, GN T1111603, GNT1105576, GNT1104273, GNT1158 384, GNT1171816), the Alzheimer's Association (AARG-17-591424, AARG-18-591358, AARG-19643133), the Dementia Australia Research Foundation, the Bethlehem Griffiths Research Foundation, the Yulgilbar Alzheimer's Research Program, the National Heart Foundation of Australia (102052), and the Charleston Conference for Alzheimer's Disease. We thank our study partners (PearlArc, SRC Innovations, Cogstate Ltd and Cambridge Cognition) for their ongoing support.Funding for theAIBLstudywas provided in part by the study partners [Australian Commonwealth Scientific Industrial and Research Organization (CSIRO), Edith Cowan University (ECU), Florey Institute, University of Melbourne), Dementia Australia (DA), Austin Health, CogState Ltd., Sarich Institute]. The study also received support from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).YY Lim is supported by an NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (GNT1162645). MP Pase is supported by a Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship (GNT102052). RF Buckley is supported by a National Institutes of Health K99-R00 award (K99AG061238). L Bransby is supported by a Dementia Australia Research Foundation PhD Scholarship.