Journal article

Does the use of inhaled corticosteroids in asthma benefit lung function in the long-term? A systematic review and meta-analysis

Daniel J Tan, Din S Bui, Xin Dai, Caroline J Lodge, Adrian J Lowe, Paul S Thomas, Deborah Jarvis, Michael J Abramson, E Haydn Walters, Jennifer L Perret, Shyamali C Dharmage

EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY REVIEW | EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD | Published : 2021

Abstract

While asthma is known to be associated with an increased risk of progressive lung function impairments and fixed airflow obstruction, there is ongoing debate on whether inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) modify these long-term risks. Searches were performed of the PubMed, Embase and CENTRAL databases up to 22 July 2019 for studies with follow-up ≥1 year that investigated the effects of maintenance ICS on changes in lung function in asthma.Inclusion criteria were met by 13 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) (n=11 678) and 11 observational studies (n=3720). Median (interquartile range) follow-up was 1.0 (1-4) and 8.4 (3-28) years, respectively. In the RCTs, predominantly in individuals with mild a..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia European collaborative grant scheme as part of ALEC (Ageing Lungs in European Cohorts - European Union's Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme)


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was supported by funds from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia European collaborative grant scheme (1101313) as part of ALEC (Ageing Lungs in European Cohorts funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme under grant agreement 633212). The funding bodies were not involved in the included work nor the decision to publish. DJT was supported by a NHMRC Postgraduate Scholarship and Royal Australian College of Physicians (RACP) Woolcock Scholarship. Funding information for this article has been deposited with the Crossref Funder Registry.