Journal article

Novelty seeking is associated with increased body weight and orbitofrontal grey matter volume reduction

Marius Ludwig, Maike Richter, Janik Goltermann, Ronny Redlich, Jonathan Repple, Claas Flint, Dominik Grotegerd, Katharina Koch, Elisabeth J Leehr, Susanne Meinert, Carina Hulsmann, Verena Enneking, Harald Kugel, Tim Hahn, Bernhard T Baune, Udo Dannlowski, Nils Opel

Psychoneuroendocrinology | PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2021

Abstract

Novelty seeking (NS) has previously been identified as a personality trait that is associated with elevated body mass index (BMI) and obesity. Of note, both obesity and reduced impulse control - a core feature of NS - have previously been associated with grey matter volume (GMV) reductions in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Yet, it remains unknown, if body weight-related grey matter decline in the OFC might be explained by higher levels of NS. To address this question, we studied associations between NS, BMI and brain structure in 355 healthy subjects. Brain images were pre-processed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). BMI was calculated from self-reported height and weight. The Tridimensio..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Innovative Medizinische Forschung (IMF) of the Medical Faculty of Munster, Germany


Awarded by Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF) of the Medical Faculty of Munster, Germany


Awarded by University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Germany (UKGM)


Awarded by German Research Foundation (DFG)


Funding Acknowledgements

The study was funded by grants of Innovative Medizinische Forschung (IMF) of the Medical Faculty of Munster, Germany (DA120309 to UD, DA111107 to UD, and DA211012 to UD), the Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF) of the Medical Faculty of Munster, Germany (grant Dan3/012/17 to UD), and a research grant of the University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Germany (UKGM) (7/2013 MR to UD), by grants of the German Research Foundation (DFG; grants FOR 2107, DA1151/5-1 to UD, and SFB-TRR58, Project C09 to UD) and the Deanery of the Medical Faculty of the University of Munster, Germany.