Journal article

Australian and New Zealand Guideline for Mild to Moderate Head Injuries in Children

Franz E Babl, Emma Tavender, Dustin W Ballard, Meredith L Borland, Ed Oakley, Elizabeth Cotterell, Lambros Halkidis, Stacy Goergen, Gavin A Davis, David Perry, Vicki Anderson, Karen M Barlow, Peter Barnett, Scott Bennetts, Roisin Bhamjee, Joanne Cole, John Craven, Libby Haskell, Ben Lawton, Anna Lithgow Show all

EMERGENCY MEDICINE AUSTRALASIA | WILEY | Published : 2021

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Children frequently present with head injuries to acute care settings. Although international paediatric clinical practice guidelines for head injuries exist, they do not address all considerations related to triage, imaging, observation versus admission, transfer, discharge and follow-up of mild to moderate head injuries relevant to the Australian and New Zealand context. The Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT) set out to develop an evidence-based, locally applicable, practical clinical guideline for the care of children with mild to moderate head injuries presenting to acute care settings. METHODS: A multidisciplinary Guideline Work..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Research Excellence grants for Paediatric Emergency Medicine, Canberra, Australia


Awarded by Health Research Council of New Zealand


Funding Acknowledgements

The PREDICT Australian and New Zealand Guideline for Mild to Moderate Head Injuries in Children was developed with funding support from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Research Excellence grants for Paediatric Emergency Medicine (GNT1058560/GNT1171228), Canberra, Australia, administered by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, and from the Royal Children's Hospital Foundation, Melbourne, Australia. The project was also supported by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure programme. FEB's time was part funded by an NHMRC Practitioner Fellowship, Canberra, Australia and a grant from the Royal Children's Hospital Foundation, Melbourne, Australia. SRD's time was part funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand (HRC13/556) and Cure Kids New Zealand.