Journal article

Review article: Developing the Australian and New Zealand Guideline for Mild to Moderate Head Injuries in Children: An adoption/adaption approach

Emma Tavender, Dustin W Ballard, Agnes Wilson, Meredith L Borland, Ed Oakley, Elizabeth Cotterell, Catherine L Wilson, Jenny Ring, Stuart R Dalziel, Franz E Babl

EMERGENCY MEDICINE AUSTRALASIA | WILEY | Published : 2021

Abstract

The Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT) released the Australian and New Zealand Guideline for Mild to Moderate Head Injuries in Children in 2021. We describe innovative and practical methods used to develop this guideline. Informed by GRADE-ADOLOPMENT and ADAPTE frameworks, we adopted or adapted recommendations from multiple high-quality guidelines or developed de novo recommendations. A Guideline Steering Committee and a multidisciplinary Guideline Working Group of 25 key stakeholder representatives formulated the guideline scope and developed 33 clinical questions. We identified four relevant high-quality source guidelines; their recommendatio..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Research Excellence grants for Paediatric Emergency Medicine, Canberra, Australia


Awarded by Health Research Council of New Zealand


Funding Acknowledgements

The PREDICT Australian and New Zealand Guideline for Mild to Moderate Head Injuries in Children was developed with funding support from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centre of Research Excellence grants for Paediatric Emergency Medicine (GNT1058560/GNT1171228), Canberra, Australia, administered by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, and from the Royal Children's Hospital Foundation, Melbourne, Australia. The project was also supported by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure program. FEB's time was part funded by an NHMRC Practitioner Fellowship, Canberra, Australia, and a grant from the Royal Children's Hospital Foundation, Melbourne, Australia. SRD's time was part funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand (HRC13/556) and Cure Kids New Zealand.