Journal article

The worse the better? Quantile treatment effects of a conditional cash transfer programme on mental health

Julius Ohrnberger, Eleonora Fichera, Matt Sutton, Laura Anselmi

Health Policy and Planning | Oxford University Press (OUP) | Published : 2020

Abstract

Poor mental health is a pressing global health problem, with high prevalence among poor populations from low-income countries. Existing studies of conditional cash transfer (CCT) effects on mental health have found positive effects. However, there is a gap in the literature on population-wide effects of cash transfers on mental health and if and how these vary by the severity of mental illness. We use the Malawian Longitudinal Study of Family and Health containing 790 adult participants in the Malawi Incentive Programme, a year-long randomized controlled trial. We estimate average and distributional quantile treatment effects and we examine how these effects vary by gender, HIV status and us..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institute of Child Health and Development at the University of Pennsylvania


Awarded by National Institute on Aging at the University of Pennsylvania


Awarded by National Institute of Child Health and Development Population Research Infrastructure Program at the University of Pennsylvania


Awarded by Penn Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) - NIAID


Awarded by MRC Skill Development Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The Malawi Longitudinal Study of Families and Health (MLSFH) has been supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Development (grant numbers R03HD058976, R21HD050652, R01HD044228, R01HD053781), the National Institute on Aging (grant number P30AG12836), the Boettner Center for Pensions and Retirement Security at the University of Pennsylvania, and the National Institute of Child Health and Development Population Research Infrastructure Program (grant number R24HD-044964), all at the University of Pennsylvania. The MLSFH has also been supported by for pilot funding received through the Penn Center for AIDS Research (CFAR), supported by NIAID AI045008, and the Penn Institute on Aging. Julius Ohrnberger acknowledges financial support from the MRC Skill Development Fellowship MR/T025409/1 and from the President's Doctoral Scholarship award at the University of Julius Ohrnberger acknowledges financial support from the MRC Skill Development Fellowship MR/T025409/1 and from the President's Doctoral Scholarship award at the University of Manchester.