Journal article

Australian Bat Lyssavirus: Analysis of National Bat Surveillance Data from 2010 to 2016

Rachel Iglesias, Keren Cox-Witton, Hume Field, Lee F Skerratt, Janine Barrett

VIRUSES-BASEL | MDPI | Published : 2021

Abstract

Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV) was first described in 1996 and has been regularly detected in Australian bats since that time. While the virus does not cause population level impacts in bats and has minimal impacts on domestic animals, it does pose a public health risk. For this reason, bats are monitored for ABLV and a national dataset is collated and maintained by Wildlife Health Australia. The 2010-2016 dataset was analysed using logistic regression and time-series analysis to identify predictors of infection status in bats and the factors associated with human exposure to bats. In common with previous passive surveillance studies, we found that little red flying-foxes (Pteropus scapula..

View full abstract

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Emerging Pandemic Threats PREDICT


Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health


Funding Acknowledgements

HF was supported in part by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Emerging Pandemic Threats PREDICT (Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00102) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (Award No. R01AI110964).