Journal article

Peer-to-Peer Sharing of Social Media Messages on Sexual Health in a School-Based Intervention: Opportunities and Challenges Identified in the STASH Feasibility Trial

Maija Hirvonen, Carrie Purcell, Lawrie Elliott, Julia Bailey, Sharon Anne Simpson, Lisa McDaid, Laurence Moore, Kirstin Rebecca Mitchell

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH | JMIR PUBLICATIONS, INC | Published : 2021

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There is a strong interest in the use of social media to spread positive sexual health messages through social networks of young people. However, research suggests that this potential may be limited by a reluctance to be visibly associated with sexual health content on the web or social media and by the lack of trust in the veracity of peer sources. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate opportunities and challenges of using social media to facilitate peer-to-peer sharing of sexual health messages within the context of STASH (Sexually Transmitted Infections and Sexual Health), a secondary school-based and peer-led sexual health intervention. METHODS: Following traini..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research Program


Awarded by Edinburgh and Lothian Health Foundation


Awarded by Scottish Government


Awarded by Scottish Government Chief Scientist Office at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow


Awarded by MRC Strategic Award


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors are indebted to all the young people and professionals who gave their time and expertise at their stakeholder consultations and events. They thank all the students in the study schools who gave their time to participate in the evaluation and the peer supporters, their contact teachers, and senior management teams for their enthusiasm and commitment throughout STASH. They are indebted to Fast Forward and West Lothian Drug and Alcohol Service who co-designed and delivered the STASH intervention, along with the research team, and to their study collaborators Sally Good (Evidence to Impact Ltd) and Yvonne Kerr and Lesley Walker (Healthy Respect, Edinburgh). In addition, they thank Julie Riddell and Susan Patterson for assistance with fieldwork. The study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research Program (14/182/14). The intervention costs were funded by Edinburgh and Lothian Health Foundation (861) and the Scottish Government (14/182/14). KM, LM, CP, LMD, and SS are supported by the United Kingdom Medical Research Council and the Scottish Government Chief Scientist Office at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow (MC_UU_12017/11, SPHSU11, MC_UU_12017/14, and SPHSU14). SS was also supported by the MRC Strategic Award (MC-PC-13027). Data are available from the authors on request.