Journal article

Measurement of the interconnected turgor pressure and envelope elasticity of live bacterial cells

Huanxin Zhang, Huabin Wang, Jonathan J Wilksch, Richard A Strugnell, Michelle L Gee, Xi-Qiao Feng

SOFT MATTER | ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY | Published : 2021

Abstract

Turgor pressure and envelope elasticity of bacterial cells are two mechanical parameters that play a dominant role in cellular deformation, division, and motility. However, a clear understanding of these two properties is lacking because of their strongly interconnected mechanisms. This study established a nanoindentation method to precisely measure the turgor pressure and envelope elasticity of live bacteria. The indentation force-depth curves of Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria were recorded with atomic force microscopy. Through combination of dimensional analysis and numerical simulations, an explicit expression was derived to decouple the two properties of individual bacteria from the nano..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Key R&D Program of China


Awarded by National Natural Science Foundation of China


Awarded by Natural Science Foundation of Chongqing


Awarded by Chongqing Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program for Excellent Returned Overseas Chinese Talents


Awarded by Australian Government National Health and Medical Research Council Program Grant


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Key R&D Program of China (Grant No. 2017YFF0106303), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. U1932132, 11921002, and 11620101001), and Natural Science Foundation of Chongqing (Grant No. cstc2018jcyjAX0405). H. W. was supported by a Chongqing Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program for Excellent Returned Overseas Chinese Talents (Grant No. Y82z440). R. A. S. was supported by the Australian Government National Health and Medical Research Council Program Grant (Grant No. 1092262) and Australian Research Council Discovery Project (Grant No. DP170104321).