Journal article

Programmable Phototaxis of Metal-Phenolic Particle Microswimmers

Gan Lin, Joseph J Richardson, Heba Ahmed, Quinn A Besford, Andrew J Christofferson, Sebastian Beyer, Zhixing Lin, Amgad R Rezk, Marco Savioli, Jiajing Zhou, Chris F McConville, Christina Cortez-Jugo, Leslie Y Yeo, Frank Caruso

ADVANCED MATERIALS | WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH | Published : 2021

Abstract

Light-driven directional motion is common in nature but remains a challenge for synthetic microparticles, particularly regarding collective motion on a macroscopic scale. Successfully engineering microparticles with light-driven collective motion could lead to breakthroughs in drug delivery, contaminant sensing, environmental remediation, and artificial life. Herein, metal-phenolic particle microswimmers capable of autonomously sensing and swimming toward an external light source are reported, with the speed regulated by the wavelength and intensity of illumination. These microswimmers can travel macroscopic distances (centimeters) and can remain illuminated for hours without degradation of ..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Awarded by Australian Government


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was conducted and funded by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology (project number CE140100036). F.C. acknowledges the award of a National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Principal Research Fellowship (GNT1135806). This work was performed in part at the Materials Characterization and Fabrication Platform (MCFP) at The University of Melbourne and the Victorian Node of the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF). This research was undertaken with the assistance of resources and services (resource grant nr3) from the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI), which is supported by the Australian Government. The authors acknowledge Dr. Ana Buzanich for her valuable assistance with EXAFS measurements and the Bessy II synchrotron. The authors thank Prof. Trevor Smith, Dr. Christopher Hall, and Paul Brannon from The University of Melbourne for their assistance with microscopy experiments, Min Liu from The University of Melbourne for assistance with nitrogen adsorption analysis, and Dr. Sukhvir Kaur Bhangu and Dr. Rene Lafleur from The University of Melbourne for discussion on NMR.