Journal article

Greenness may improve lung health in low-moderate but not high air pollution areas: Seven Northeastern Cities' study

Yang Zhou, Dinh S Bui, Jennifer L Perret, Adrian J Lowe, Caroline J Lodge, Iana Markevych, Joachim Heinrich, Michael S Bloom, Luke D Knibbs, Bin Jalaludin, Bo-Yi Yang, Hong-Yao Yu, Xiao-Wen Zeng, Yunjiang Yu, Shyamali C Dharmage, Guang-Hui Dong

THORAX | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2021

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: There is growing interest in the impact of greenness exposure on airway diseases, but the impact of greenness on lung function in children is limited. We aimed to investigate the associations between greenness surrounding schools and lung function in children and whether these associations are modified by air pollution exposure. METHODS: Between 2012 and 2013, a cross-sectional survey and spirometry were performed among 6740 school children. Lung function patterns were determined as obstructive forced expiratory volume 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC <0.8) or restrictive (FEV1/FVC ≥0.8 but FVC <80% of predicted). School greenness was defined by Normalized difference vegetat..

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Grants

Awarded by National Natural Science Foundation of China


Awarded by National Key Research and Development Programme of China


Awarded by Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities


Awarded by Guangdong Province Natural Science Foundation


Awarded by Science and Technology Programme of Guangzhou


Funding Acknowledgements

The research was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.91543208; No.81703179; No.81673128; No.82003409); the National Key Research and Development Programme of China (No.2016YFC0207000); the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No.16ykzd02; No.17ykpy16); the Guangdong Province Natural Science Foundation (No.2016A030313342; 2017A050501062); and Science and Technology Programme of Guangzhou (201807010032; 201803010054).