Journal article

Sex differences in the neuroanatomy of alcohol dependence: hippocampus and amygdala subregions in a sample of 966 people from the ENIGMA Addiction Working Group

Sally Grace, Maria Gloria Rossetti, Nicholas Allen, Albert Batalla, Marcella Bellani, Paolo Brambilla, Yann Chye, Janna Cousijn, Anna E Goudriaan, Robert Hester, Kent Hutchison, Izelle Labuschagne, Reza Momenan, Rocio Martin-Santos, Peter Rendell, Nadia Solowij, Rajita Sinha, Chiang-shan Ray Li, Lianne Schmaal, Zsuzsika Sjoerds Show all

TRANSLATIONAL PSYCHIATRY | SPRINGERNATURE | Published : 2021

Abstract

Males and females with alcohol dependence have distinct mental health and cognitive problems. Animal models of addiction postulate that the underlying neurobiological mechanisms are partially distinct, but there is little evidence of sex differences in humans with alcohol dependence as most neuroimaging studies have been conducted in males. We examined hippocampal and amygdala subregions in a large sample of 966 people from the ENIGMA Addiction Working Group. This comprised 643 people with alcohol dependence (225 females), and a comparison group of 323 people without alcohol dependence (98 females). Males with alcohol dependence had smaller volumes of the total amygdala and its basolateral n..

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Grants

Awarded by U.S. National Institute of Health


Awarded by U.S. National Institute of Mental Health


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank Diny Thomson, Danielle Tichelaar, Emily Robinson, Emily Watt, Iris Starcheus, Jamie Gladwell, John Tzaferis, Kirsty Kearney, and Simone Mizzi for their significant contributions to the image quality checks. We thank Preveetha Patalay for her helpful contributions to the statistical modelling; Philip Saemann for providing comments on code to generate the images for visual inspection; and Juan Dominguez for his helpful comments on the code to perform the FreeSurfer segmentation. This work was supported by the MASSIVE HPC facility (www.massive.org.au).This work was also supported by funding from the U.S. National Institute of Health (NIH R01DA047119) and the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health (NIH/NIMH R01MH116147).