Journal article

Expressing a moth abcc2 gene in transgenic Drosophila causes susceptibility to Bt Cry1Ac without requiring a cadherin-like protein receptor

Tristan Stevens, Sisi Song, John B Bruning, Amanda Choo, Simon W Baxter

INSECT BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY | PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD | Published : 2017

Abstract

Bt toxins ingested by insect pests can bind to midgut receptors and cause death, although several steps in this process remain unclear. Multiple Bt toxin receptors have been identified in Lepidoptera, including a cadherin-like protein (CaLP), which is central to several models explaining Bt toxins' mode of action. Mutations in the Plutella xylostella ATP-dependent binding cassette transporter C2 (Px-abcc2), rather than CaLP, are genetically linked with Bt Cry1Ac resistance. Here we expressed Px-abcc2 in Drosophila and performed larval bioassays to determine whether this protein acts as an effective Bt receptor. Cry1Ac had no effect on larvae expressing Px-abcc2 in salivary glands, yet larvae..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank the Australian Drosophila Biomedical Research Support Facility for importing ABCC2 fly stocks (www.ozdros.com). Louise O'Keefe (University of Adelaide) and Donna Denton (University of South Australia) kindly provided several fly stocks and useful discussion and Tom Walsh for the HD73 strain. We also thank an anonymous reviewer to for providing useful comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. This work was supported by the Australian Research Council grants DP120100047 and FT140101303 to SWB.