Journal article

Gender differences in physician decisions to adopt new prescription drugs.

Susan J Méndez, Anthony Scott, Yuting Zhang

Social Science and Medicine | Elsevier | Published : 2021

Abstract

Physician adoption of new technologies is a key issue for population health and the sustainability of the healthcare system. This paper explores gender differences in general practitioners' (GPs) adoption of new oral anticoagulants. We combine detailed individual data on physician and practice style characteristics from the Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL) panel survey of Australian physicians with administrative prescribing data from the Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) and the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) for the period January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2015. After adjusting for various factors proposed in the literature as drivers of this gend..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by The University of Melbourne Faculty of Business and Economics Human Ethics Advisory Group


Awarded by Monash University Standing Committee on Ethics in Research Involving Humans


Funding Acknowledgements

This research used data from the MABEL longitudinal survey of doctors. Funding for MABEL was provided by the National Health and Medical Research Council (2007-2016: 454799 and 1019605); the Australian Department of Health and Ageing (2008); Health Workforce Australia (2013); The University of Melbourne, Medibank Better Health Foundation, the NSW Department of Health, and the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services (2017); and the Australian Government Department of Health, the Australian Digital Health Agency, and the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services (2018). The study was approved by The University of Melbourne Faculty of Business and Economics Human Ethics Advisory Group (Ref. 0709559) and the Monash University Standing Committee on Ethics in Research Involving Humans (Ref: 195535 CF07/1102-2007000291). Financial support from the Australian-American Health Policy Fellowship (Y. Zhang) and the University of Melbourne Faculty of Business and Economics research grant (S. M ' endez) is gratefully acknowledged. Funders had no involvement in the study design, in the collection, analyses and interpretation of data, and in writing of the article. The opinions expressed in this paper and any errors are those of the authors alone.