Journal article

Quality, Features, and Presence of Behavior Change Techniques in Mobile Apps Designed to Improve Physical Activity in Pregnant Women: Systematic Search and Content Analysis

Melanie Hayman, Kristie-Lee Alfrey, Summer Cannon, Stephanie Alley, Amanda L Rebar, Susan Williams, Camille E Short, Abby Altazan, Natalie Comardelle, Sinead Currie, Caitlin Denton, Cheryce L Harrison, Tayla Lamerton, Gabriela P Mena, Lisa Moran, Michelle Mottola, Taniya S Nagpal, Lisa Vincze, Stephanie Schoeppe

JMIR MHEALTH AND UHEALTH | JMIR PUBLICATIONS, INC | Published : 2021

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Physical activity during pregnancy is associated with several health benefits for the mother and child. However, very few women participate in regular physical activity during pregnancy. eHealth platforms (internet and mobile apps) have become an important information source for pregnant women. Although the use of pregnancy-related apps has significantly increased among pregnant women, very little is known about their theoretical underpinnings, including their utilization of behavior change techniques (BCTs). This is despite research suggesting that inclusion of BCTs in eHealth interventions are important for promoting healthy behaviors, including physical activity. OBJECTIVE: Th..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by National Heart Foundation of Australia


Awarded by National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by National Institute of Nursing Research


Awarded by Australian Government's Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF)


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors received no specific funding for this work. Other funding support is as follows: SS is supported by an Early Career Fellowship (GNT1125586) from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and by a Postdoctoral Fellowship (ID 101240) from the National Heart Foundation of Australia. SA is funded by a National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship (ID 102609). AA and NC are supported by the National Institutes of Health, which fund the Nutrition Obesity Research Center (P30DK072476) and the National Institute of Nursing Research (R01 NR017644). GPM is supported by a University of Queensland International Postgraduate Research Scholarship. TSN is funded by a Mitacs Fellowship supported by The Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada.LM is funded by a National Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship and also funded by the Australian Government's Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF; TABP-18-0001). The MRFF provides funding to support health and medical research and innovation, with the objective of improving the health and well-being of Australians. MRFF funding has been provided to The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre under the MRFF Boosting Preventive Health Research Program. Further information on the MRFF is available in the Australian Government Department of Health website.