Journal article

Crosstalk between Dpp and Tor signaling coordinates autophagy-dependent midgut degradation

Donna Denton, Tianqi Xu, Sonia Dayan, Shannon Nicolson, Sharad Kumar

CELL DEATH & DISEASE | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

The majority of developmentally programmed cell death (PCD) is mediated by caspase-dependent apoptosis; however, additional modalities, including autophagy-dependent cell death, have important spatiotemporally restricted functions. Autophagy involves the engulfment of cytoplasmic components in a double membrane vesicle for delivery to the lysosome. An established model for autophagy-dependent PCD is Drosophila larval midgut removal during metamorphosis. Our previous work demonstrated that growth arrest is required to initiate autophagy-dependent midgut degradation and Target of rapamycin (Tor) limits autophagy induction. In further studies, we uncovered a role for Decapentaplegic (Dpp) in co..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by TRiP at Harvard Medical School (NIH/NIGMS)


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Project Grant (1041807 and 1124490) to S.K. and D.D., and an Australian Research Council Grant (DP170100623) and a Senior Principal Research Fellowship (1103006) to S.K. S.N. was supported by a Research Training Program scholarship. We thank the Australian Drosophila Research Support Facility (Monash University, Vic., Australia), Drosophila Genetic Resource Center (Kyoto, Japan), Vienna Drosophila Resource Center, and Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center for Drosophila stocks, Developmental Studies Hybridoma Bank (University of Iowa) for antibodies, Amanda Rogers at SA Pathology for H&E tissue processing, and Ruth Williams at Adelaide Microscopy for sample preparation for TEM. We thank the TRiP at Harvard Medical School (NIH/NIGMS R01-GM084947) for providing transgenic RNAi fly stocks.