Journal article

Dpp regulates autophagy-dependent midgut removal and signals to block ecdysone production

Donna Denton, Tianqi Xu, Sonia Dayan, Shannon Nicolson, Sharad Kumar

CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

Animal development and homeostasis require the programmed removal of cells. Autophagy-dependent cell deletion is a unique form of cell death often involved in bulk degradation of tissues. In Drosophila the steroid hormone ecdysone controls developmental transitions and triggers the autophagy-dependent removal of the obsolete larval midgut. The production of ecdysone is exquisitely coordinated with signals from numerous organ systems to mediate the correct timing of such developmental programs. Here we report an unexpected role for the Drosophila bone morphogenetic protein/transforming growth factor β ligand, Decapentaplegic (Dpp), in the regulation of ecdysone-mediated midgut degradation. We..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Awarded by NIH/NIGMS


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Project Grant (1124490), an Australian Research Council Grant (DP170100623), and a NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship (1103006). We thank the Australian Drosophila Research Support Facility (Monash University, Melbourne), Drosophila Genetic Resource Center (Kyoto, Japan), Vienna Drosophila Resource Center, and Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center for Drosophila stocks, Developmental Studies Hybridoma Bank (University of Iowa) for antibodies, Amanda Rogers for H&E tissue processing and Ruth Williams at Adelaide Microscopy for sample preparation for TEM. We thank the TRiP at Harvard Medical School (NIH/NIGMS R01-GM084947) for providing transgenic RNAi fly stocks.