Journal article

Cellular networks controlling T cell persistence in adoptive cell therapy

Jack D Chan, Junyun Lai, Clare Y Slaney, Axel Kallies, Paul A Beavis, Phillip K Darcy

NATURE REVIEWS IMMUNOLOGY | NATURE RESEARCH | Published : 2021

Abstract

The antitumour activity of endogenous or adoptively transferred tumour-specific T cells is highly dependent on their differentiation status. It is now apparent that less differentiated T cells compared with fully differentiated effector T cells have better antitumour therapeutic effects owing to their enhanced capacity to expand and their long-term persistence. In patients with cancer, the presence of endogenous or adoptively transferred T cells with stem-like memory or precursor phenotype correlates with improved therapeutic outcomes. Advances in our understanding of T cell differentiation states at the epigenetic and transcriptional levels have led to the development of novel methods to ge..

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Grants

Awarded by US Cancer Research Institute Irvington postdoctoral fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Australian National Breast Cancer Foundation fellowship


Awarded by Victorian Cancer Agency Research fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge funding support from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC), the Australian National Breast Cancer Foundation, the Cancer Council of Victoria and the ClearBridge Foundation. J.D.C. is supported by an Australian Government Research Training Program scholarship and a Peter MacCallum Cancer Foundation postgraduate scholarship. J.L. is a recipient of a US Cancer Research Institute Irvington postdoctoral fellowship (award no. 3530). A.K. is supported by an NHMRC senior research fellowship (APP1139607). P.A.B. is supported by an Australian National Breast Cancer Foundation fellowship (ECF-17-005) and a Victorian Cancer Agency Research fellowship (MCRF20011). P.K.D. is supported by an NHMRC senior research fellowship (APP1136680).