Journal article

Reprogramming the anti-tumor immune response via CRISPR genetic and epigenetic editing

Eric Alves, Shahama Taifour, Riccardo Dolcetti, Jonathan Chee, Anna K Nowak, Silvana Gaudieri, Pilar Blancafort

MOLECULAR THERAPY-METHODS & CLINICAL DEVELOPMENT | CELL PRESS | Published : 2021

Abstract

Precise clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-mediated genetic and epigenetic manipulation of the immune response has become a promising immunotherapeutic approach toward combating tumorigenesis and tumor progression. CRISPR-based immunologic reprograming in cancer therapy comprises the locus-specific enhancement of host immunity, the improvement of tumor immunogenicity, and the suppression of tumor immunoevasion. To date, the ex vivo re-engineering of immune cells directed to inhibit the expression of immune checkpoints or to express synthetic immune receptors (chimeric antigen receptor therapy) has shown success in some settings, such as in the treatment of mel..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by National Breast Cancer Foundation


Awarded by Cancer Council Queensland


Awarded by Cure Brain Cancer


Awarded by US DOD Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program


Awarded by Australian Research Council Future Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank Dr. Emily Golden (The Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research) for assistance with the figures. This work was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) (APP1187328, APP1109428, APP1165208, APP1147528, APP113 0212, and APP1197652); the National Institutes of Health (R01CA170370 and R01DA036906); the National Breast Cancer Foundation (IIRS-18-47 and IIRS-20-124); the Cancer Council Queensland (APP1145758 and APP1165064); Cure Brain Cancer (NBCNBCF19-009); and by US DOD Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program (CA190006). P.B. is a recipient of an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (FT130101767), a Cancer Council of Western Australia Research Fellowship, and a Wesfarmers Women's Cancers Fellowship; J.C. is a recipient of aWA Department of Health Merit Award; E.A. is a recipient of an Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship at The University of Western Australia, a BioZone PhD Scholarship at The University of Western Australia, and a Cancer Council WA PhD Top Up Scholarship. Funding for the open access charge was provided by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).