Journal article

Detection of respiratory syncytial virus defective genomes in nasal secretions is associated with distinct clinical outcomes.

Sébastien A Felt, Yan Sun, Agnieszka Jozwik, Allan Paras, Maximillian S Habibi, David Nickle, Larry Anderson, Emna Achouri, Kristen A Feemster, Ana María Cárdenas, Kedir N Turi, Meiping Chang, Tina V Hartert, Shaon Sengupta, Christopher Chiu, Carolina B López

Nature Microbiology | Published : 2021

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory illness in children, immunosuppressed individuals and the elderly. However, the viral factors influencing the clinical outcome of RSV infections remain poorly defined. Defective viral genomes (DVGs) can suppress virus replication by competing for viral proteins and by stimulating antiviral immunity. We studied the association between detection of DVGs of the copy-back type and disease severity in three RSV A-confirmed cohorts. In hospitalized children, detection of DVGs in respiratory samples at or around the time of admission associated strongly with more severe disease, higher viral load and a stronger pro-inflammatory response. Interest..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | NIH | National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)


Awarded by Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (Division of Intramural Research of the NIAID)


Awarded by U.S. Department of Health & Human Services | NIH | National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)


Awarded by NHLBI NIH HHS


Awarded by Wellcome Trust (Wellcome)


Awarded by RCUK | Medical Research Council (MRC)


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