Journal article

Interfacial piezoelectric polarization locking in printable Ti3C2Tx MXene-fluoropolymer composites

Nick A Shepelin, Peter C Sherrell, Emmanuel N Skountzos, Eirini Goudeli, Jizhen Zhang, Vanessa C Lussini, Beenish Imtiaz, Ken Aldren S Usman, Greg W Dicinoski, Joseph G Shapter, Joselito M Razal, Amanda Ellis

NATURE COMMUNICATIONS | NATURE RESEARCH | Published : 2021

Abstract

Piezoelectric fluoropolymers convert mechanical energy to electricity and are ideal for sustainably providing power to electronic devices. To convert mechanical energy, a net polarization must be induced in the fluoropolymer, which is currently achieved via an energy-intensive electrical poling process. Eliminating this process will enable the low-energy production of efficient energy harvesters. Here, by combining molecular dynamics simulations, piezoresponse force microscopy, and electrodynamic measurements, we reveal a hitherto unseen polarization locking phenomena of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) perpendicular to the basal plane of two-dimensional (2D) Ti3C2T..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Government through the Australian Research Council's Linkage Projects funding scheme


Awarded by Australian Government through the Australian Research Council's Future Fellowships funding scheme


Awarded by Australian Government through the Australian Research Council's Industry Transformation Research Hub funding scheme


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the Australian Government through the Australian Research Council's Linkage Projects funding scheme (LP160100071), Future Fellowships funding scheme (FT130100380), and Industry Transformation Research Hub funding scheme (IH140100018). This work was performed in part at the Materials Characterization and Fabrication Platform (MCFP) at the University of Melbourne and the Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication (MCN) in the Victorian Node of the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF). The authors wish to thank Dr. James Bullock and Dr. Brett Johnson for performing the dielectric characterization, and Robert Delaney for helpful discussions on energy harvesting methods.