Journal article

Stress reactivity as a putative mechanism linking childhood trauma with clinical outcomes in individuals at ultra-high-risk for psychosis: Findings from the EU-GEI High Risk Study

I Paetzold, I Myin-Germeys, A Schick, B Nelson, E Velthorst, F Schirmbeck, J van Os, C Morgan, J Hartmann, M van der Gaag, L de Haan, L Valmaggia, P McGuire, M Kempton, U Reininghaus

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRIC SCIENCES | CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS | Published : 2021

Abstract

AIMS: Childhood trauma is associated with an elevated risk for psychosis, but the psychological mechanisms involved remain largely unclear. This study aimed to investigate emotional and psychotic stress reactivity in daily life as a putative mechanism linking childhood trauma and clinical outcomes in individuals at ultra-high-risk (UHR) for psychosis. METHODS: Experience sampling methodology was used to measure momentary stress, affect and psychotic experiences in the daily life of N = 79 UHR individuals in the EU-GEI High Risk Study. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported childhood trauma. Clinical outcomes were assessed at baseline, 1- and 2-year follow-up. RES..

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Grants

Awarded by European Community


Awarded by Wellcome Trust


Awarded by UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)


Awarded by Medical Research Council Fellowship


Awarded by Heisenberg professorship from the German Research Foundation


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (grant number HEALTH-F2-2009-241909, Project EU-GEI), the Wellcome Trust (grant number WT087417) to CM, a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship of the UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) (grant number NIHR-PDF-201104065), a Medical Research Council Fellowship to MK (grant number MR/J008915/1), the Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre, National Institute for Health Research, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and a Heisenberg professorship from the German Research Foundation (grant number 389624707) to UR.