Journal article

Fatal swine acute diarrhoea syndrome caused by an HKU2-related coronavirus of bat origin

Peng Zhou, Hang Fan, Tian Lan, Xing-Lou Yang, Wei-Feng Shi, Wei Zhang, Yan Zhu, Ya-Wei Zhang, Qing-Mei Xie, Shailendra Mani, Xiao-Shuang Zheng, Bei Li, Jin-Man Li, Hua Guo, Guang-Qian Pei, Xiao-Ping An, Jun-Wei Chen, Ling Zhou, Kai-Jie Mai, Zi-Xian Wu Show all

Nature | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2018

Abstract

Cross-species transmission of viruses from wildlife animal reservoirs poses a marked threat to human and animal health 1 . Bats have been recognized as one of the most important reservoirs for emerging viruses and the transmission of a coronavirus that originated in bats to humans via intermediate hosts was responsible for the high-impact emerging zoonosis, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) 2-10 . Here we provide virological, epidemiological, evolutionary and experimental evidence that a novel HKU2-related bat coronavirus, swine acute diarrhoea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV), is the aetiological agent that was responsible for a large-scale outbreak of fatal disease in pigs in China t..

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Grants

Awarded by Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences


Awarded by China Natural Science Foundation


Awarded by National Key Research and Development Program of China


Awarded by National Science and Technology Spark Program


Awarded by Guangdong Province Agricultural Industry Technology System Project


Awarded by State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity


Awarded by Taishan Scholars program of Shandong province


Awarded by NRF


Awarded by NMRC


Awarded by Funds for Environment Construction & Capacity Building of GDAS' Research Platform


Awarded by United States Agency for International Development Emerging Pandemic Threats PREDICT project


Awarded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank S.-B. Xiao for providing pig cell lines, P. Burbelo for providing the luciferase immunoprecipitation system vector and L. Zhu for enabling the rapid synthesis of the S gene; the WIV animal facilities; J. Min for help with the preparation of the immunohistochemistry samples; and G.-J. Zhu and A. A. Chmura for assistance with bat sampling. This work was jointly supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDPB0301) to Z.-L.S., China Natural Science Foundation (81290341 and 31621061 to Z.-L.S., 81661148058 to P.Z., 31672564 and 31472217 to J.-Y.M., 81572045, 81672001 and 81621005 to Y.-G.T.), National Key Research and Development Program of China (2015AA020108, 2016YFC1202705, AWS16J020 and AWS15J006) to Y.-G.T.; National Science and Technology Spark Program (2012GA780026) and Guangdong Province Agricultural Industry Technology System Project (2016LM1112) to J.-Y.M., State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity (SKLPBS1518) to Y.-G.T., Taishan Scholars program of Shandong province (ts201511056 to W.-F.S.), NRF grants NRF2012NRF-CRP001-056, NRF2016NRF-NSFC002-013 and NMRC grant CDPHRG/0006/2014 to L.-F.W., Funds for Environment Construction & Capacity Building of GDAS' Research Platform (2016GDASPT-0215) to LBZ, United States Agency for International Development Emerging Pandemic Threats PREDICT project (AID-OAA-A-14-00102), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (Award Number R01AI110964) to P.D. and Z.-L.S.