Journal article

The effectiveness of natalizumab vs fingolimod-A comparison of international registry studies

Johanna B Andersen, Sifat Sharmin, Mathilde Lefort, Nils Koch-Henriksen, Finn Sellebjerg, Per Soelberg Sorensen, Claudia C Hilt Christensen, Peter Rasmussen, Michael B Jensen, Jette L Frederiksen, Stephan Bramow, Henrik K Mathiesen, Karen Schreiber, Dana Horakova, Eva K Havrdova, Raed Alroughani, Guillermo Izquierdo, Sara Eichau, Serkan Ozakbas, Francesco Patti Show all

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS AND RELATED DISORDERS | ELSEVIER SCI LTD | Published : 2021

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Natalizumab and fingolimod were the first preparations recommended for disease breakthrough in priorly treated relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Of three published head-to-head studies two showed that natalizumab is the more effective to prevent relapses and EDSS worsening. METHODS: By re-analyzing original published results from MSBase, France, and Denmark using uniform methodologies, we aimed at identifying the effects of differences in methodology, in the MS-populations, and at re-evaluating the differences in effectiveness between the two drugs. We gained access to copies of the individual amended databases and pooled all data. We used uniform inclusion/exclusion criter..

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Grants

Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Agence Nationale de la Recherche


Funding Acknowledgements

The MSBase Foundation is a not-for-profit organization that receives support from Biogen, Novartis, Merck, Roche, Teva and Sanofi Genzyme. The study was conducted separately and apart from the guidance of the sponsors. CORe received funding from NHMRC [1140766, 1129789, 1157717] to support studies of comparative effectiveness of MS therapies. OFSEP was supported by a grant provided by the French State and handled by the "Agence Nationale de la Recherche," within the framework of the "Investments for the Future" program, under the reference ANR-10-COHO-002, by the Eugene Devic EDMUS Foundation against multiple sclerosis and by the ARSEP Foundation. DMSR did not receive any funding to collaborate in this study.